College of the Atlantic is one of the nation's best institutions for undergraduate education, according to the 2017 edition of Princeton Review's Best 381 Colleges.College of the Atlantic is one of the nation's best institutions for undergraduate education, according to the 2017 edition of Princeton Review's Best 381 Colleges.

College of the Atlantic is one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2017 edition of its flagship college guide, “The Best 381 Colleges” (Penguin Random House / Princeton Review, $23.99, August 30, 2016).

COA ranks among the top 20 in 9 categories, including #2 for LGBTQ-Friendly and #6 for Best Campus Food. COA comes in at #11 for Professors Get High Marks, #16 for Most Beautiful Campus, and #20 for Best College Dorms.

The school receives a 99 out of 99 “Green” rating, which measures COA’s commitment to sustainability and the environment in its policies, practices and education programs. COA is included on the Princeton Review’s Green Honor Roll, along with just two-dozen schools nationally.

“There are thousands of colleges in the country, and it’s fantastic to be recognized as one of the best in so many categories,” College of the Atlantic president Darron Collins ’92 said. “I think more than anything it speaks to the dedication that our faculty, staff and students have for this institution.”


Students use a rigid hull inflatable to travel from College of the Atlantic's MV Osprey to the <a href="/islands/mount-desert-rock/">COA Edward McC. Blair Marine Research Station</a> on Mount Desert Rock. The treeless island, 25 miles out to sea, is owned by the College and is used for students and faculty research into marine mammals and seabirds.Students use a rigid hull inflatable to travel from College of the Atlantic's MV Osprey to the COA Edward McC. Blair Marine Research Station on Mount Desert Rock. The treeless island, 25 miles out to sea, is owned by the College and is used for students and faculty research into marine mammals and seabirds.In its profile on COA, The Princeton Review praises it for its “unique educational model [which] helps students ‘merge [their] talents/interests in a meaningful and applicable way,’ and allows for graduate-level research and real-world work experience at the undergraduate level.”

The Review quotes extensively from COA students the company surveyed for the book. Among their comments: “We are constantly thinking about the latest environmental/social justice issue and thoughtful debates about these subjects happen at every meal;” and, “COA is a college and a community that demands cognizance, compassion, and trust.”

“College of the Atlantic’s outstanding academics are the chief reason we chose it for this book and we strongly recommend it to applicants,” says Robert Franek, Princeton Review’s Senior VP-Publisher and author of “The Best 381 Colleges”. “We make our selections primarily based on data we collect through our annual surveys of administrators at several hundred four-year colleges. Additionally, we give considerable weight to observations from our school visits, opinions of our staff and our 24-member National College Counselor Advisory Board, and an unparalleled amount of feedback we get from our surveys of students attending these schools. We also keep a wide representation of colleges in the book by region, size, selectivity and character.”

“College of the Atlantic’s unique educational model helps students merge their talents/interests in a meaningful and applicable way” - The Princeton Review.

Only about 15% of America’s 2,500 four-year colleges are profiled in the book, which is one of The Princeton Review’s most popular guides. Published annually since 1992, it includes detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores for all schools in eight categories, plus ranking lists of top 20 schools in the book in 62 categories based on The Princeton Review’s surveys of students attending the colleges.

The Princeton Review does not rank the colleges from 1 to 381 in any category. Instead it uses students’ ratings of their schools to compile 62 ranking lists of top 20 colleges in the book in various categories. The lists in this edition are entirely based on The Princeton Review’s survey of 143,000 students (about 375 per campus on average) attending the colleges.

The 80-question survey asks students to rate their schools on several topics and report on their campus experiences at them. Topics range from their assessments of their professors as teachers to opinions about their school’s library, career services, and student body’s political leanings. The Princeton Review explains the basis for each ranking list at http://www.princetonreview.com/college-rankings/ranking-methodology.

In a “Survey Says” sidebar in the book’s profile on COA, The Princeton Review lists topics that COA students surveyed for the book were in most agreement about in their answers to survey questions. The list includes: “Students are always studying,” “Great financial aid,” and “Class discussions are always encouraged.”

COA students translating their rock and mineral identification skills from the classroom to the field, at Camden Hills State Park, ME. COA is part of a collaborative, <a href="/live/news/909-national-science-foundation-awards-field-based">$340,733 National Science Foundation program</a> to offer environmentally focused students real world STEM field and professional skills. The program at COA is led by Anne T. and Robert M. Bass chair of Earth Systems and Geoscience <a href="/live/profiles/1132-sarah-r-hall">Dr. Sarah Hall</a>.COA students translating their rock and mineral identification skills from the classroom to the field, at Camden Hills State Park, ME. COA is part of a collaborative, $340,733 National Science Foundation program to offer environmentally focused students real world STEM field and professional skills. The program at COA is led by Anne T. and Robert M. Bass chair of Earth Systems and Geoscience Dr. Sarah Hall.

“The Best 381 Colleges” is the 25th edition of The Princeton Review’s annual “Best Colleges” book. It is one of 150 Princeton Review books published by Penguin Random House in a line that also includes guides for dozens of standardized tests, and other college guides including “The Complete Book of Colleges” and “Colleges That Pay You Back.”

The Princeton Review (www.PrincetonReview.com) is an education services company known for its tutoring, test-prep courses, books, and other student resources. Headquartered in Natick, MA, the company is an operating business of Match Group (NASDAQ: MTCH). It is not affiliated with Princeton University.

College of the Atlantic is an interdisciplinary, experiential college of 350 students and 35 faculty members offering a Bachelor of Arts degree in human ecology – the study of how humans interact with our natural, social and technological environments. Each student develops their own course of study in human ecology, working across multiple disciplines, collaborating, innovating, and thinking far outside the box. Founded in 1969, College of the Atlantic was the first college in the U.S. to focus on the relationship between humans and the environment.

The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in Natick, MA and is an operating business of Match Group (NASDAQ: MTCH). For more information, visit www.princetonreview.com.