“Maine is a good place for turkeys,” <a href="/farms/peggy-rockefeller-farms/">COA Peggy Rockefeller Farms</a> manager C.J. Walks says. “When they do struggle it's when there is a heat wave of major fluctuations in the weather [and] as long as we can make to the weekend before Thanksgiving without a major snowstorm, we are doing great.”“Maine is a good place for turkeys,” COA Peggy Rockefeller Farms manager C.J. Walks says. “When they do struggle it's when there is a heat wave of major fluctuations in the weather [and] as long as we can make to the weekend before Thanksgiving without a major snowstorm, we are doing great.”

“The turkey industry in Maine is doing very well,” according to Dr. Justin Bergeron, assistant state veterinarian with the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. “It was a really good production year this past year.”

That’s a far cry from two years ago when the highly pathogenic avian influenza — or HPAI — was responsible for the deaths of 7.5 million turkeys nationwide, creating a turkey supply shortage in 2015 and leaving many Maine growers with nowhere to turn to obtain that season’s new birds.

This year, there should be no issues for anyone looking to roast a fresh Maine turkey on Thanksgiving.

“Our turkeys are all pasture-based,” Walke said. “We set up a heated space for them the first few weeks and when they are old enough we move them outside into movable shelters that get moved around once or twice a day.”

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