HOW TO FIND THE INSTRUCTOR

GRADING

TEXTBOOK

COURSE DESIGN AND OTHER NOTES

 

Fisheries and their Management

Winter 2002

 

Instructor

Where is the class?

Where is the Lab?

Sean Todd

Seafox: Tuesdays and Fridays, 11.10&endash;12.35 pm

L1, Fri 1.00-3.55pm (as needed)

Go to syllabus

Where/How to find me....

Office:

 

Turrets Annex (3rd floor)

Office Hours:

Mondays 10.00&endash;12.00 pm or by appointment

Phone:

ext. 265

Email:

stodd@ecology.coa.edu

Web-page:

http://www.coa.edu/faculty/webpages/stodd/index.html

Course web-page:

http://www.coa.edu/faculty/webpages/stodd/oceanweb/fishman/fmhome.htm

Course Description:

Humans have exploited the biotic resources of the ocean for thousands of years. Although early harvesting probably had minimal ecological and population impact, increased exploitation due to increasing market demand and technological advances have placed significant stress on many of the world's "fisheries". Those exploited species that have thus far avoided becoming commercially or biologically extinct, are, in many cases, threatened by collapse due to over-fishing. This course examines the exploitation of biotic resources in the oceans, including invertebrates, fish, and marine mammal populations. Importantly, it also examines the fishing techniques, fisheries technology and management of fisheries, and critiques and reviews the development of the mathematical modeling on which management is based. The class will be offered in seminar style, with students involved in the discussion and critique of readings, and researching and presenting various case histories. Students will be evaluated on the basis of participation and quality of presentations and term projects. ES. Intermediate. Course size limited to 12. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, by demonstration of competence in QR and ES disciplines. Course fee $40.

 

Assessment:

%

Case History Presentation

10

Case History Written Submission

30

Final Project presentation

10

Final Project Submission

30

Class Participation/Labs

20

Textbook:

(available online at Amazon.com, or from Sherman's locally)

Jennings S., Kaiser, M. J., and Reynolds, J. D. (2001). Marine Fisheries Ecology. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK

…a number of other readings will also be placed on reserve: Go to reserved readings

Laboratory fee: $40

 

Course Design and notes about the class

This is a new class designed to serve as an intermediate introduction to fisheries science. As such, this topic is vast and highly multi-disciplinary, including contributions from biologists, statisticians, economists, sociologists and politicians. Thus, we will likely only scratch the surface of its content. The course is also designed to dovetail into the 2002 Spring offering of Marine Policy; students may wish to consider taking these two classes in tandem.

Because of the scope of the field, students will help review what is a substantial diversity of knowledge. Students will be evaluated on the basis of participation and quality of presentations and term projects. Although there is no official 'lab' period, I am reserving Friday afternoons for potential field trips. If the opportunity arises, I reserve the right to take you out in the field on these days. If no trip is planned for that week, I expect students to use these hours to read the course text and other articles assigned, or to perform literature research for their projects, as noted below in the schedule.

Finally, this course has an accompanying web page that provides links, etc. Feel free to use this site to its maximum potential. If you have any recommendations about how to improve the site, let me know&emdash;its there for your benefit!

 

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