College of the Atlantic has research stations on two of them: Great Duck Island and Mount Desert Rock. But we also have students, faculty, and alumni doing research all over the world, from French Frigate Shoals to the Barren Islands of Alaska.

Related Areas of Study:

COA student members of the Island Research Center, directed by conservation biologist John Anderson, have the opportunity not only to monitor populations of seabirds, but also to learn techniques for censusing wildlife, running an island research station, and applying GIS and GPS technologies to real-world conservation projects.

  • NEWS
    Climate Change will Impact the Older Population, Future Generations Most [Herald Palladium]
    The speed of change sunk home recently while planning a vacation to the Gulf of Maine: that northern strip of New England coast from Cape Anne, just north of Boston, to the northern tip of Maine and southern tip of Nova Scotia. College of the Atlantic professor John Anderson points out the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any similar body of water in the world.
  • NEWS
    How one Tiny Maine Island Prepares Budding Scientists for a Warmer World [BDN]
    Though it has been consistently occupied for nearly 200 years, this small, treeless island 20 miles off the coast of Maine has never been all that habitable to humans and is expected to become even less so. With the Gulf of Maine warming faster than most oceans around the world, College of the Atlantic’s remote research station is on the front lines of climate change.
  • NEWS
    Rising Seas | New England Climate Change [Yankee Magazine]
    In the morning fog the captain moors his boat, Osprey. We can’t see Great Duck Island, which is only 250 feet away. The 46-foot boat, which belongs to College of the Atlantic, is bringing professor John Anderson and four students back to the island this morning, 16 miles from Bar Harbor, Maine, to continue their bird research.