Abe Noe Hays '00 is is teaching farmers a more sustainable way to fertilize crops. By using urine, phosphorus can be recycled instead of running off into bodies of water.Abe Noe Hays '00 is is teaching farmers a more sustainable way to fertilize crops. By using urine, phosphorus can be recycled instead of running off into bodies of water.

Phosphorus is in pretty much everything: bombs, toothpaste, cheese. It’s irreplaceable. 

Most of our phosphorus—or phosphate, which is its usable form—goes into fertilizer. The farmers pile it on, and then the bulk of it just washes right off into the rivers and then ocean. It’s really hard to get phosphorus out of the ocean, which means, as far as we’re concerned, that phosphorus is pretty much gone once it’s in the water.

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