College of the Atlantic has research stations on two of them: Great Duck Island and Mount Desert Rock. But we also have students, faculty, and alumni doing research all over the world, from French Frigate Shoals to the Barren Islands of Alaska.

Related Areas of Study:

COA student members of the Island Research Center, directed by conservation biologist John Anderson, have the opportunity not only to monitor populations of seabirds, but also to learn techniques for censusing wildlife, running an island research station, and applying GIS and GPS technologies to real-world conservation projects.

  • NEWS
    Rising Seas | New England Climate Change (Yankee Magazine)
    In the morning fog the captain moors his boat, Osprey. We can’t see Great Duck Island, which is only 250 feet away. The 46-foot boat, which belongs to College of the Atlantic, is bringing professor John Anderson and four students back to the island this morning, 16 miles from Bar Harbor, Maine, to continue their bird research.
  • NEWS
    As Seas Warm, Whales Face New Dangers [New York Times]
    From the top of the six-story lighthouse, water stretches beyond the horizon in every direction. A foghorn bleats twice at 22-second intervals, interrupting the endless chatter of herring gulls. At least twice a day, researchers with College of the Atlantic’s Allied Whale climb steps and ladders and crawl through a modest glass doorway to scan the surrounding sea, looking for the distinctive spout of a whale.
  • NEWS
    2017’s Most Popular Content [American Scientist]
    Coming in at #3, College of the Atlantic W. H. Drury Professor of Ecology and Natural History John G.T. Anderson’s “Why Ecology Needs Natural History” argues that most theoretical breakthroughs are preceded by the kind of deep observational work that has fallen out of vogue in the past half century.